SCENTS

 

Jump to:

Our Favorite Blends

Special Blends

Fragrances   A–C   F–O   P–W

Essential Oils  A–B   C–E   F–L   M–R   S–Y

 

SCENTING TIPS

How to pick a custom scent

First, ask yourself what type of scent you generally like.

Either keep it simple and pick one or two from a single category

or layer a few scents. Don’t worry, it’s easier than it sounds!

Layering Scents

Pick a high note or low note you really like and work from there.

High notes - Sweet, Floral, Fruit & Citrus

Middle notes - Fresh, Earth, Botanical

Low Notes - Tea & Musk, Forest, Spice

FRAGRANCES vs. ESSENTIAL OILS

Fragrances

By definition, the term fragrance (at least as it is used in industry) always implies the use of synthetic aromachemicals. All of our fragrances incorporate natural ingredients for superior odor and longevity. Synthetic components make some fragrances available that would otherwise be unaffordable.

Essential Oils

Essential oils are the volatile, aromatic oils obtained by steam or hydrodistillation of botanicals. Different parts of the plants can be used to obtain essential oils, including the flowers, leaves, seeds, roots, stems, bark, wood, etc. Essential oils are also known as volatile oils, ethereal oils or simply as the “oil of” the plant from which they were extracted. An oil is “essential” in the sense that it carries a distinctive scent, or essence, of the plant. Essential oils undeniably have been found to carry positive properties from the plant materials they were extracted from.


OUR FAVORITES   

Simple E.O.

Cedarwoood & Wild Orange

Clary Sage & Lemonwood

Eucalyptus & Spearmint

Grapefruit & Ginger

Peppermint & Lavendar

Rosemary & Bergamot

Sage & Geranium

Simple Fragrance

Bamboo & Vanilla

Honeysuckle & Amber Musk

Osmanthus & Plum Tea

Magnolia & Black Tea

Pomegranate & Green Tea

Pear & Fig

Sandalwood & Seamoss

Simple Fragrance and E.O.

Sherbert & Cypress

Blackberry & Cocoa

Coconut & Coriander

Cucumber & Spearmint

Jasmine & Blood Orange

Plumeria & Patchouli

Tuberose & Ylang Ylang

SPECIAL BLENDS  

Breezy: Plumeria, Wild Orange, Pomegranate, Coconut & Mango

Earthy: Cedarwood, Clary Sage, Amyris, Eucalyptus & Rosewood

Fancy:Fancy: Plum Tea, Violet, Green Tea, Champagne & Ylang Ylang

Flowery: Osmanthus, Tuberose, Magnolia, Ylang Ylang & Melissa

Fresh: Bergamot, Bamboo, Lettuce, Coriander & Juniperberry

Happy: Blood Orange, Grapefruit, Sandalwood, Cardamom & Sherbert

Manly: Cologne, Cedarwood, Ginger, Bay Rum & Frankincense

Musky: Amber Musk, White Musk, Mahogany, Amyris & Vanilla

Sleepy: Lavender, Vanilla Musk, Chamomile, Nutmeg & Rose

Spicy: Patchouli, Black Pepper, Black Tea, Clove & Cinnamon


FRAGRANCES   

All fragrances are phthalate free.

A–C

Almond Biscotti: smells like candied almonds

Amber Musk: smells like a sweet warm musk with a woody balsamic undertone

Apple Pie: smells like a warm homemade apple pie with just the right amout of spice

Baby Powder: smells like the classic powdery, floral fragrance

Bamboo: smells like wild bamboo stalks with a hint of crisp aloe

Bay Rum: smells like allspice, capers, cloves, nutmeg, crushed orange and crisp pine needles

Blackberry: smells like fresh, juicy blackberries

Black Cherry: smells like, you guessed it, ripe black cherries

Black Tea: smells smoky, sexy and sophisticated, reminiscent of roasted tea leaves with strong overtones of tobacco

Blueberry: smells like juicy, ripe blueberries with a touch of musk and pairs deliciously with our vanilla fragrance

Chai Tea: this is a sweet, buttery fragrance oil with a touch of spice that holds true to a hot sip of chai tea

Champagne: smells like the fizzy bubbles in ginger ale or a glass of sweet champagne

Cherry Blossom: this is a fruity, floral scent with hints of tart currant, mingling with pink cherry blossom

Cinnamon Sugar: smells of a sweet melt-in-your-mouth cinnamon vanilla sticky bun

Coconut: fresh summer-loving coconut that is somewhat reminiscent of sunscreen

Coconut Macaroon: has a pleasant, candy-like, nutty-baked scent, as if you had just pulled freshly baked coconut macaroons out of the oven

Cologne: a very masculine scent with a clean, sharp finish, the perfect combination of barbershop aromas

Cranberry: smells sweet and tart, like fresh cranberries

Cucumber Melon: smells clean, fresh and fruity, perfect for children and adults alike

Cut Grass: smells fresh, clean and vibrant, like fresh-cut green grass

F–O

Fig: has the exotic and mysterious smell of a freshly picked fig

Flower Musk: smells like a thousand flowers combined to make one comforting fragrance

Frosting: has heavy notes of Madagascar Vanilla and freshly churned butter, reminiscent of cream cheese frosting

Gardenia: a delicate scent of freshly bloomed gardenia

Green Apple: smells like the first bite of a crisp and juicy Granny Smith apple with a tart and invigorating kick to it

Green Tea: this scent is calming and grounding like a hot cup of green tea

Honeysuckle: smells just like a blooming honeysuckle at dusk on a summer night

Jasmine: smells true to an exotic, seductive jasmine

Laundry: this scent is reminiscent of clean laundry or fresh cotton

Leather: smells like a deep and musky, brown suede leather jacket

Lettuce: crisp and clean and everything green, this scent exhibits how fresh romaine and iceberg lettuce can smell

Lilac: a heavy scent of enchanting lilac with an undertone of sweetness

Linden Blossom: a powerful floral scent that is sweet and mesmerizing

Magnolia: smells of true magnolia characterized by being a fresh, sweet, lemony, floral scent with deep vanilla undertones

Mahogany: warm with a sharp mahogany wood top note

Mango: this is as straightforward as a mango scent can get with its juicy and tropically deliciousness

Milk & Honey: a warm, smooth yet sharp scent of butterscotch

Mint Moroccan: this is an inviting blend of spearmint, peppermint and corn mint that is refreshing and invigorating

Osmanthus: this is one of our favorites because of its strength and its beautiful fruity, floral character that blends well with almost anything

P–W

Peach: this an excellent and extremely powerful scent that will make you want to take a big bite out of a fresh orchard peach

Pear: this pear fragrance is designed after the crisp, green Anjou Pear with its sweetness and freshness

Plumeria: this is a tropical fruity scent of sweet ambrosial nectar that is great for summer and is reminiscent of a Hawaiian vacation

Plum Tea: this clean, fruity, floral scent has a beguiling soft freshness that smells like white tea and damask plum with herb notes and is beautifully supported with sweet notes of honeydew melon, quince apple, lily of the valley and chamomile

Pomegranate: this scent has sensual sparkling notes of citrus, dewberry and cassis to dress up the deeper notes of musk and vanilla all threaded with a sweet tart twist

Pumpkin Harvest: smells like warm pumpkin pie and is perfect for fall

Red Tea: this scent has intriguingly exotic, fruity, sweet notes of lychee and has underlying tart cherries

Rose: beautifully replicates the scent of a soft traditional pink rose

Sandalwood: a calming scent that is woody, smooth and sensual

Sea Moss: could be described as fresh, green and almost a little kelp-y

Sherbert: this bright, stimulating, citrusy and sweet scent is perfect for spring and summer

Soap: is the classic soap scent that makes you feel squeaky clean, just like fresh laundry

Strawberry: strong and deep pink, this scent is sweet yet tart

Sweet Pea: this is a delicate yet strong floral scent, perfect for a signature spring scent

Tuberose: this tuberous Mexican perennial smells sweet and heavy and are prized by florists everywhere with its base note of green moss that adds a sophisticated foundation for the honeyed tuberose

Vanilla: this scent is a sweet and calming aroma of warm vanilla

Vanilla Musk: this scent is a deeper, muskier version of our classic vanilla

Violet: this is a delicate floral scent that is true to a traditional English violet scent

White Musk: a velvety, warm and feminine musk that perfectly pairs with florals

ESSENTIAL OILS   

For external use only, do not ingest. Always dilute essential oils before applying to skin. Keep out of eyes, ears, nose, mouth, etc. Keep away from children and pets. If you have sensitive skin, epilepsy, heart or kidney problems, or any serious medical condition, do not use essential oils unless advised by a physician or medical professional that it is safe. Do not use essential oils on babies under 3 months. Use caution & research when using essential oils for pregnant women and children under 10 years of age.

A–B

Absinthe

Smells like: earthy and green with a bitter, nutty finish

Pairs well with: floral, earthy, and fresh scents (our favorites include lavender, jasmine, ylang ylang and frankincense)

Perfume Note: base

Fun fact: Wormwood, or artemisia absinthium, is the main ingredient in the popular green drink absinthe.

Amyris

Smells like: warm, woody, musty

Pairs well with: citrus scents (our favorites include blood orange and lemongrass)

Perfume note: base

Fun fact: Amyris is also known as West Indian Sandalwood.

Anise

Smells like: rich and sweet scent of licorice

Pairs well with: botanical and citrus scents (our favorites include tangerine and thyme)

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: Good & Plenty has anise oil as an ingredient.

 

Basil

Smells like: a sweet and spicy scent with a woody undertone

Pairs well with: sweet citrus and floral scents

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: Basil is a sign of love and devotion between young couples in some cultures.

 

Bergamot

Smells like: a warm cup of Earl Grey tea

Pairs well with: floral, earthy, and fresh scents (our favorites include bamboo, clary sage and lavender)

Perfume Note: top

Fun fact: The bergamot fruit is inedible.

Warning: May cause photosensitivity.

 

Black Pepper

Smells like: a warm, crisp aroma of peppercorn

Perfume Note: middle

Pairs well with: floral, forest, and fruity scents (our favorites include bergamot, peach and tuberose)

Fun fact: Black pepper has been used as a commodity and is a prized trade good in India as well as Southeast Asia since before the Pyramids were built. In some Western legal systems within India, they still use it as a token of payment called “peppercorn rent”.

Warning: Use with caution, conduct a patch test of diluted essential oil on the inner arm before using; do not use if redness or irritation occurs.

 

Blood Orange

Smells like: citrusy, sweet

Pairs well with: spicy, earthy, musky, botanical, fresh and sweet scents (our favorites include jasmine, sandalwood, sage, ylang ylang and clove)

Fun fact: The deep red, blood-colored flesh of blood oranges is due to high antioxidant levels.

Warning: May cause photosensitivity.

 

Bug Off

Smells like: a spicy, herbal, and mildly sweet scent

Pairs well with: citrus or floral scents

C–E

Calendula

Smells like: grassy, heavy, citrus scent

Pairs well with: floral or citrus scents (our favorites include bergamot and linden blossom)

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: “Calendula” is derived from the plant’s tendency to bloom according to the calendar year, either once a month or with the new moon.

 

Cardamom

Smells like: woody, spicy, rich, soft sweetness

Pairs well with: almost everything! Add to a citrus, floral, or fresh scent for a bit of spice (our favorites include bergamot, patchouli, honeysuckle, and fresh coconut).

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: The Greeks and Romans used to use Cardamom as an ingredient to create spicy perfumes that were used as symbols of royalty and luxury.

 

Carrot Seed

Smells like: warm, sweet, slightly earthy

Pairs well with: Carrot seed is usually not respected for its aroma. If the scent is enjoyed, it can be paired with sage, cedar wood or geranium.

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Carrot Seed essential oil is mainly obtained from biennial wild carrots grown mainly in Europe.

 

Cedarwood

Smells like: sweet and sturdy, warm wood

Pairs well with: citrus, floral, and masculine scents (our favorites include tuberose, wild orange and leather)

Perfume note: base

Fun fact: Cedarwood oil was used by the ancient Sumerians as a base for paints.

 

Chamomile

Smells like: a crisp, bright, soothing cup of chamomile tea

Pairs well with: botanical and floral scents (our favorites include lavender, clary sage, vanilla, and sweet pea)

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: In ancient Egypt, Chamomile was used as an offering to the sun god.

 

Christmas Morning

Smells like: Christmas tree needles, cinnamon sticks, candy, hollyberry, nutmeg and Christmas cookies!

Pairs well with: spicy scents (our favorite is cocoa!)

 

Cinnamon Bark

Smells like: rich ground cinnamon

Pairs well with: sweet and spicy scents (our favorites include bergamot, cardamom and vanilla)

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Cinnamon is one of the most well recognized scents in the world! Ask anyone and I’ll bet you they know what cinnamon smells like!

Warning: Use with caution, conduct a patch test of diluted essential oil on the inner arm before using; do not use if redness or irritation occurs.

 

Citronella

Smells like: lemony, slightly sweet herbal

Pairs well with: eucalyptus, lavender, rosemary, geranium and other

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: You can add this to our body/linen spray and use on your furniture to help deter pets from household furniture.

 

Clary Sage

Smells like: earthy, sweet, herbaceous bliss

Pairs well with: botanical, forest and citrus scents (our favorites include bergamot, black pepper, lemon, pine needle and patchouli)

Perfume note: middle

 

Clementine

Smells like: a hybrid between mandarin and bitter orange

Pairs well with: cedarwood, clary sage, ylang ylang and rosewood

Perfume note: top

Warning: May cause photosensitivity.

 

Clove Bud

Smells like: smoky, warm yet a bit bitter scent of true clove, but richer and woodsier

Pairs well with: mandarin, mango, sage and masculine scents

Perfume note: middle

Warning: Use with caution, conduct a patch test of diluted essential oil on the inner arm before using; do not use if redness or irrit ation occurs.

 

Cocoa Bean

Smells like: chocolate!

Pairs well with: almost everything! Who doesn’t love chocolate? (our favorites include vanilla, peppermint, rose, and tuberose)

Perfume note: base

Fun Fact: “Theobroma Cocoa”, the Latin name of the tree that our cocoa essential oil is derived from, translates to “Food of the Gods” for its highly esteemed place in Aztec society.

 

Coffee Bean

Smells like: freshly brewed coffee

Pairs well with: vanilla, peppermint, cocoa and ginger

Perfume note: base

Fun fact: Even though coffee essential oil is derived from the bean, it contains only a small amount of caffeine.

 

Coriander

Smells like: sweet, herbaceous, candy-like

Pairs well with: spicy and citrus scents (one of our favorites is jasmine)

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Coriander seeds are derived from the Cilantro plant.

 

Cypress

Smells like: fresh, evergreen, balsamic undertone

Pairs well with: chamomile, clary sage, lavender and ylang ylang

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Cypress is associated with death and afterlife because the trees are often planted in graveyards and the wood is often used to make coffins.

 

Eucalyptus

Smells like: fresh, medicinal, earthy scent

Pairs well with: botanical scents (our favorites include rosemary, ginger, lavender, peppermint and cedarwood)

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: Eucalyptus is one of the oldest native medicines used in Australia.

 

Eucalyptus Lemon

Smells like: a potent,bright, citronella-like aroma

Pairs well with: citrus and earthy scents

Perfume note: top

Fun Fact: Lemon Eucalyptus is a great source for natural citronellal

F–L

Fennel

Smells like: sweet, licorice-like scent

Pairs well with: bergamot, lemon, sandalwood, pine and grapefruit

Perfume note: top/middle

Fun fact: The ancient Greeks believed that fennel brought upon courage, strength, and longevity.

 

Frankincense

Smells like: fresh, nutty, woody scent

Pairs well with: geranium, lemon, patchouli, and rose

Perfume note: base

Fun fact: Frankincense is used in many religious ceremonies across the globe.

 

Geranium

Smells like: heavy, sweet, floral scent

Pairs well with: citrus and botanical scents (our favorites include clary sage, bergamot, patchouli, peppermint, and grapefruit)

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Geranium has been notorious for its healing properties throughout history.

 

Ginger

Smells like: fresh, warm, sweet scent

Pairs well with: cedarwood, clove, jasmine, mandarin, and vetiver

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Ginger (not the essential oil) has been used in gingerbread recipes for over 4,000 years.

 

Grapefruit

Smells like: bright, tangy, citrus scent

Pairs well with: black pepper, fennel, and geranium

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: The grapefruit is a hybrid of the sweet orange and the pomelo.

Warning: May cause photosensitivity.

 

Juniperberry

Pairs well with: cedarwood, lavender, and clary sage

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Juniperberries have traditionally been used to purify the air and to repel insects.

 

Lavender

Smell like: herbaceous, floral, bright scent

Pairs well with: geranium, mandarin, peppermint

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: The latin term “lavare”, which lavender is derived from, means “to wash” due to the the many ailments that lavender has been said aids in curing/improving.

 

Lemon

Smells like: sweet, crisp and tangy like a freshly picked lemon

Pairs well with: lavender, eucalyptus, frankincense, and juniperberry

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: Lemons are harvested for essential oils while green for higher quality oil.

Warning: May cause photosensitivity.

 

Lemongrass

Smells like: heavy, lemon, green scent

Pairs well with: basil, cedarwood, and grapefruit

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: Often when the plant material is spent from distillation it is used as food for cattle.

 

Lime

Smells like: skittles!

Pairs well with: bergamot, eucalyptus and ginger

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: The scent of lime can help improve concentration. Some scholars will even use it before an exam.

Warning: May cause photosensitivity.

M–R

Marjoram

Smells like: a woody, spicy, and medicinal scent

Pairs well with: lavender, frankincense, and bergamot

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: The Romans called marjoram the “herb of happiness”.

 

Mandarin

Smells like: a light, fruity, citrus scent

Pairs well with: patchouli, rose, lemon, or geranium

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: The name mandarin traces back to the Mandarins of China.

Warning: May cause photosensitivity.

 

Melissa

Smells like: a light, green, citrus scent

Pairs well with: chamomile, frankincense, and geranium

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: “Melissa” comes from the Greek word for honey bee.

 

Nutmeg

Smells like: a sweet, musky, spice scent

Pairs well with: cardamom, clementine, vanilla, or patchouli

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Connecticut is nicknamed the nutmeg state.

 

Oregano

Smells like: a spicy, herbaceous scent

Pairs well with: bergamot, cedarwood, eucalyptus, or lemon

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Oregano comes from the Greek word “oreganos” which translates to “joy of the mountain”.

 

Palmarosa

Smells like: a sweet, bright, floral scent

Pairs well with: bergamot, clove, or lemon

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Palmarosa is widely used in the cosmetic industry as a scenting agent.

 

Patchouli

Smells like: a sweet, musky, woodsy aroma

Pairs well with: almost everything, especially citrus scents (our favorites include sandalwood, peppermint, mango and lavender)

Perfume note: base

Fun fact: Patchouli oil improves with age!

 

Peppermint

Smells like: a fresh, herbaceous mint

Pairs well with: botanical or sweet scents (our favorites include eucalyptus, tea tree, vanilla and rosemary)

Perfume note: top

Fun fact:

 

Pine Needle

Smells like: a clean, woodsy, light scent

Pairs well with: fresh and botanical scents (our favorites include patchouli, lemon, and cedarwood)

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: Native Americans stuffed mattresses with pine needles to repel lice and fleas.

 

Rosemary

Smells like: a fresh, and herbaceous scent

Pairs well with: fresh and botanical scents (our favorites include clary sage, lemon and thyme)

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Rosemary branches were placed on the floors of medieval homes to combat the “black plague”

 

Rosewood

Smells like: a soft, sweet floral, woodsy aroma

Pairs well with: pretty much eveything! (our favorites include grapefruit, lavender, or cardamom)

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: Rosewood is a key ingredient in Channel No. 5.

S–Y

Sage

Smells like: a warm, spicy, pine-like aroma

Pairs well with: botanical, musky, fresh scents (some of our favorites include rosemary, mandarin and rosewood)

Perfume note: top

Fun fact:

 

Spearmint

Smells like: a bright, minty, spicy and herbaceous scent

Pairs well with: earth, fresh, and fruit scents (some of our favorites include basil, eucalyptus, jasmine and cucumber melon)

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: Spearmint oil is not considered to be as strong as peppermint oil and can be used as a substitute in children products.

 

Tangerine

Smells like: a fresh, orange-like, sweet scent

Pairs well with: botanical scents as well as citrus scents (our favorites include geranium, blood orange and ylang ylang)

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Tangerine and Mandarin are considered to be the same botanical species.

Warning: May cause photosensitivity.

 

Tea Tree

Smells like: a fresh, spicy, camphoraceous aroma

Pairs well with: peppermint, thyme and lavender

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: The Australian Aborigines used to brew the leaves of the tree into a herbal tea, hence “tea” tree.

 

Thieves Oil

Smells like: a sweet, lemony, menthol scent

Fun Fact: Thieves oil developed according to the legend about the four thieves in 15th century England who used these and other aromatics to protect themselves while robbing plague victims

 

Thyme

Smells like: a fresh, herbal with spicy scent with medicinal undertones

Pairs well with: citrus and botanical scents (some of our favomarjoram, bergamot and rosemary

Perfume note: middle

Fun fact: Roman soldiers would bathe in thyme before battle to give them courage and strength. It was also in the Middle Ages given to jousting knights as a symbol of their bravery.

Warning: Use with caution, conduct a patch test of diluted essential oil on the inner arm before using; do not use if redness or irritation occurs.

 

Verbena

Smells like: lemony, light, herbaceous

Pairs well with: cedarwood, lavender

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: Lemon Verbena was brought to North America in the 18th century.

Warning: May cause photosensitivity.

 

Vetiver

Smells like: heavy, earthy, woody, smoky

Pairs well with: patchouli, sandalwood, or rose

Perfume note: base

Fun fact: Vetiver has been used as a fragrance since antiquity in much of the Eastern world.

 

Wild Orange

Smells like: true orange, light, citrus, sweet

Pairs well with: lavender, ylang ylang, or bergamot>

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: Wild orange can immediately give you a sense of balance and energy just by inhaling its beautiful aroma.

Warning: May cause photosensitivity.

 

Wintergreen

Smells like: minty, fresh, toothpaste

Pairs well with: cypress, geranium, lemongrass

Perfume note: top

Fun fact: Wintergreen trees are native to North America.

 

Ylang Ylang

Smells like: rich, sweet floral

Pairs well with: botanical and floral scents (our favorites include bergamot, ginger, and osmanthus)

Perfume note: base

Fun fact: Ylang Ylang is thought to be the oil of the inner child, in that it evokes the joy in being in the present moment as you would feel as a child.

 

For external use only, do not ingest. Always dilute essential oils before applying to skin. Keep out of eyes, ears, nose, mouth, etc. Keep away from children and pets. If you have sensitive skin, epilepsy, heart or kidney problems, or any serious medical condition, do not use essential oils unless advised by a physician or medical professional that it is safe. Do not use essential oils on babies under 3 months. Use caution & research when using essential oils for pregnant women and children under 10 years of age. 

 

IN CASE OF AN ACCIDENT

  1.   If essential oil gets into eyes: Immediately flush with cold milk or vegetable oil to dilute; if stinging persists, seek medical attention

  2.   If essential oil gets on hands: Use cream or vegetable oil to dilute; wash with soap and warm water; repeat if necessary

  3.   If ingested: Call National Capital Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222

  4.   If ingested by a pet: Call the Animal Poison Control Center at 1-888-426-4435; be prepared to pay $50 with a credit card